WORKSHOP!

So this is kind of a superfluous post but I’m excited. I’m here at the MCTC computer lab/library waiting for Tay to be done with class so that we can go over to Second Foundation and do our first workshop on Gender Harassment. I’m pumped. I’m nervous. I don’t know what to expect. This should be an interesting time. I printed off tons of copies of our stuff and made little notecards for everyone just in case. I hope things go well.

Connor

Rough draft of combined lesson plan AND Agenda

Gender Harassment Workshop

Gather students in a circle. Ask for their attention.

ADD POLITICAL HISTORY FEMINIST MOVEMENTS! KEVIN

 

BODY IMAGE MEDIA PORTRAYAL OF WHAT YOU SHOULD BE! TAY

 

Facilitator: Hey everyone! (My name is Madalynn. I go to school downtown at MCTC and I’m studying to be a teacher. For a group project this semester, a few of my classmates and I thought it would be awesome to put on some workshops with teenage students that deal with certain issues we find important to confront.) Today I would like to talk with you all about gender harassment. Does anyone know what that means?

Wait for answer.

Facilitator: Yeah, let’s break down this term. (write “Gender Harassment” on board/large paper) Ok, so the first word is gender, what does gender mean? (wait for response) Gender can refer to a few different things. It can refer to a person’s body biologically, for example, I was born with a woman’s body (waits for response) Yeah, gender can also be referring to how a person views themselves, which is known as gender identity. So someone who has a woman’s body may still identify as being a man, or vice versa. In our discussion today, gender will be referring to our bodies, and how we and other people treat them. Does that make sense? (write down ideas under the word gender)

Wait for answer.

Facilitator: Ok, so the second word is harassment. Does someone here want to define that word for us? (wait for response) Yeah, harassment is unwanted attention. This can be verbal or physical. It can be something someone writes down, or something someone gestures. What’s important to remember about what makes it harassment is that it is unwanted. Does that make sense? (write down ideas under the word harassment)

Wait for answer.

Facilitator: So, can anyone have any ideas about what gender harassment is then? (wait for response) That’s right, gender harassment is unwanted attention that a person receives due to their gender or gender identity. Now, let’s talk about what gender harassment looks like, especially in a school setting.

Proceed to write down students ideas, discussing the various scenarios they come up with. If the students struggle, here are some helpful suggestions:

–          Unwanted hugging, grabbing, kissing, touching

–          Making comments about other people’s bodies

–          Standing too close to someone

–          Holding someone down

–          Writing or telling dirty jokes

–          Showing dirty pictures

Facilitator: You all came up with some really great examples of what gender harassment looks like. How do you think it makes people feel when they are harassed because of their gender, or how do you think other’s feel when they witness this happen?

Have you read or seen Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone? There is a quote in that book that I didn’t notice as very important until I really thought about it.

“It takes a great deal of bravery to stand up to your enemies, but a great deal more to stand up to your friends.”
Dumbledore

I know for myself, growing up in a community of basically one race and class, that I had a lot of friends and classmates who said hurtful things. I never found it too hard to say I thought someone was being mean or hurtful, except when that person was someone that I respected or was friends with.

Have any of you heard your friends say hurtful things? Have any of you heard your friends harass someone about their gender? If you don’t feel comfortable sharing you than don’t have to and remember not to use names so that we don’t embarrass anyone in this group.

(Listen to examples of bullying by friends of students)

Did you say anything?

(Listen to stories)

I want to talk about why it is hard to talk to our friends when we think what they are doing is wrong. What makes it different then when we are talking to someone that we maybe don’t like or someone we don’t know very well?

(Discuss in group)

Does anyone have any ideas on how to talk to a friend about something like this? How do we tell a friend that we think they are wrong or are being mean or hurtful without hurting the friendship that we have with them?

 

Write down responses near corresponding examples. Suggestions:

–          Bad, sad, unsure, anxious, unsafe.

Facilitator: Alright, so now we’re going to do an activity. I’d like for us to split up into equal numbered groups, let’s say no more than four to a group. What I would like you all to do is write out a role play of someone experiencing gender harassment. You can choose one of the examples that we wrote up on the board earlier and then you can make up a situation around that example. I want you all to be sure to do three things (write down): Number one, have a clear example of gender harassment. Number two, make sure that your character has a clear emotional response to the harassment. Number three, I would like for you to figure out a way for the characters to resolve the problem and stop the gender harassment from taking place. Sound good?

The students will split up into groups. They will figure out their example and then be given 10-15 minutes to write their skits. Once they’re ready, the groups will present their skits. After each skit, we will discuss what the group did well, and what strategy they came up with to stop the gender harassment from happening. These examples will also be written on the board.

Facilitator: So, does anyone have any questions, or anything more they would like to discuss about gender harassment? (wait for response) Well, you all did a great job. I’m so happy that we could get together to discuss this, and I hope you all feel our time spent here was valuable. Everyone deserves respect. Everyone deserves to feel safe. It is really important that we do our best to create and enforce safe spaces, and you all have taken an awesome step in that direction today. Thank you so much for your time! We hope to come back and be able to share more valuable information with you all. You rock!

 

Political action that can be taken!

 

AGENDA FROM NOV 9TH!

Purpose
How will you ensure your work is public? What resources can you tap to make this more public?
How can we kwazy quilt our plans into one kwazy plan?
Rework lesson plan

Agena steps and notes
Compile and edit lessons
Talked about skit ideas and other options

GOAL KIND OF ACCOMPLISHED!

Everyone is going to edit our lesson plan and add bits and pieces!

Connor and Group

Lesson Plan and Other Thoughts

So Here is kind of a rough draft of a lesson plan (in bold)

Start off with a little background story to get the ball rolling.

Have you read or seen Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone? There is a quote in that book that I didn’t notice as very important until I really thought about it.

“It takes a great deal of bravery to stand up to your enemies, but a great deal more to stand up to your friends.”
Dumbledore

I know for myself, growing up in a community of basically one race and class, that I had a lot of friends and classmates who said hurtful things. I never found it too hard to say I thought someone was being mean or hurtful, except when that person was someone that I respected or was friends with.

Have any of you heard your friends say hurtful things? Have any of you heard your friends harass someone about their gender? If you don’t feel comfortable sharing you than don’t have to and remember not to use names so that we don’t embarrass anyone in this group.

(Listen to examples of bullying by friends of students)

Did you say anything?

(Listen to stories)

I want to talk about why it is hard to talk to our friends when we think what they are doing is wrong. What makes it different then when we are talking to someone that we maybe don’t like or someone we don’t know very well?

(Discuss in group)

Does anyone have any ideas on how to talk to a friend about something like this? How do we tell a friend that we think they are wrong or are being mean or hurtful without hurting the friendship that we have with them?

So after doing this I realized that it might be more useful to include it in another one of your ideas. Maddalyn, I mentioned in a comment on yours that I thought our two ideas could work well together. I don’t know that this idea or lesson stands alone very well in terms of what our goals are. I think I would either like to try to do that or go back to my original idea of talking about how media influences society with negative gender stereotypes, but I’m worried about the possible effectiveness of that lesson as well…

I am having an education crisis lately. I don’t know what to do about anything lately.

 

Connor

 

Florida Interviews

So I’m no journalist but this is one of the interviews I did in Gainesville. I’m really bad at using a camera because I think it’s really weird to be talking to someone and not looking at them, so that explains some goofy views at some points. This is Lauren Denitzio from The Measure [sa]. I really like a lot of the things she does musically and otherwise.

 

 

Czech it out!

Connor

First Draft Action Plan

Mission Statement

We intend to create an after school program with kids that promotes safe and open discussion relating to sexism, gender, and empowering young women.

THE ISSUE
The big issue our group is talking about is gender inequality. In the broad sense, women are discriminated against in many areas of our communities. Women are paid less. Women are objectified. Women are thought of as inferior to men in many situations with no evidence to support our societies gender bigotry. The way people are socialized in our communities makes it easy for these problems to persist. Our schools, jobs, homes, and neighborhoods help perpetuate sexism and patriarchal attitudes by teaching our youth that women are a class below men in our own version of the caste system.
Secondary Issues
There is not enough information for young adults about gender inequalities.
Our communities do not motivate young women to attempt to become part of something not typically set aside for female.

SELF INTERESTS
Connor- Sexism in music and music communities.

DESCRIBE THE PUBLIC ACHIEVEMENT PROJECT

Specific- We all have different areas of individual interest and our plan is to develop workshops with a focus on these different, but specific, interests.

Measurable- Our goals can be measured by having students who attend our workshop(s) leave with a greater understanding of issues pertaining to gender equality.

Attainable- We already have connections with possible schools where we are going to try and set up our programs. We are confident that our project will be interested in having us and that we will be able to accomplish what we seek to.

Realistic- These goals are realistic because this topic is something that kids in our communities care about. They will come to be part of these workshops and schools will recognize that and help us to achieve our goals.

Time-Bound- We have included a timeline which details when each step of our project will take place.
Our intended audience will be students in middle school and above, although we will accept students of all ages. They will have some amount of interest in equality and a will to change their own surroundings.

The stakeholders in our project will be everyone involved. Us, as group members, will put a great deal of work into this and will be striving to achieve our goals. The school employees that allow us to present at their schools will be interested to see if what we have to say is important to their students. The students can be either empowered to do something good for their community by trying to break down gender stereotypes or will be let down if we don’t make it interesting and help them become involved.

ASSESSING SUCCESS

Goal- Our goal is, essentially, to talk to kids about sexism and gender and to give them the opportunity to be involved in safe, honest, and open discussion on these topics. We want to open their eyes to things they possibly haven’t thought of or seen yet and to have our eyes opened by what they have to say. We just want students to show up and be involved in our project.

Timeline
Oct 13th- First Draft of Action Plan Done
Oct 14th- Working Draft of Action Plan Reviewed by All Members
Oct 19th- Madalynn will begin communication with Second Foundation
Oct 26th- Refine goals and meet with schools
Nov 2nd- Rough Draft of Lesson/Workshop Plans
Nov 9th Lesson Plans ready to Practice
Nov 16th- Ready for 1st Workshop
Nov 23rd- Personal Reflection (Turkey, Tofurkey, Chinese Food)
Nov 30th- Possibly present more workshops, continue to work on final presentation
That’s what I got so far guys. Copy it and edit it yourselves or comment and let me know what you think I should change or add!

“Sexism is a disgusting undercurrent in our society and it needs to be fought and challenged.”
David Combs
Connor William Macklin

My Staple

So I found stuff to with sexism in the punk rock world. I bet you guys never would have guessed that I would do something like that.

Lauren from The Measure [sa] did an interview for the blog I Live Sweat. She has a bunch of interesting things to say and it started a series of interviews of people talking about sexism in punk.

http://ilivesweat.tumblr.com/post/2929328480

It’s pretty easy to find relevant stuff on that website if you guys are interested.

Connor William Macklin